books-cupcakes
books-cupcakes:

itsleightaylor:

curelesscunt:

itsleightaylor:

steampunktendencies:

What is your Steampunk Name ?

PROFESSOR WILFRED WAKEBOTTOM

Leigh…your first name would be Ursula :’D
Lady Dorcas Wakehold!

ooooooooooooooooooooooh i didn’t see “for men/women”. I’m a lady, everyone!!

Countess Fanny Rumblehold

The Steampunk editorial staff of Grand Central Publishing comprises:
Captain Agatha Clankingwood, Colonel Henrietta Wraithfellow, Sir Neville Suppertopper, Colonel Millicent Wraithwood, Colonel Henrietta Rothtopper, Lady Ursula Wraithstone, Lady Josephine Wakedale, and Captain Ursula Worthingfeather. 
 

books-cupcakes:

itsleightaylor:

curelesscunt:

itsleightaylor:

steampunktendencies:

What is your Steampunk Name ?

PROFESSOR WILFRED WAKEBOTTOM

Leigh…your first name would be Ursula :’D

Lady Dorcas Wakehold!

ooooooooooooooooooooooh i didn’t see “for men/women”. I’m a lady, everyone!!

Countess Fanny Rumblehold

The Steampunk editorial staff of Grand Central Publishing comprises:

Captain Agatha Clankingwood, Colonel Henrietta Wraithfellow, Sir Neville Suppertopper, Colonel Millicent Wraithwood, Colonel Henrietta Rothtopper, Lady Ursula Wraithstone, Lady Josephine Wakedale, and Captain Ursula Worthingfeather. 

 

otherpplnation

Episode 284 — Brittani Sonnenberg

otherpplnation:


Brittani Sonnenberg is the guest. Her debut novel, Home Leave, is now available from Grand Central Publishing.

Karen Russell says

"It’s hard to believe that this astonishing novel is Brittani Sonnenberg’s first—she writes about family with wisdom, humor, and native daring. Here is Persephone’s journey, undertaken by an entire family, the Kriegsteins, who ricochet through time zones, moving from Berlin to Singapore to Wisconsin to Shanghai to Atlanta, together and alone. Sonnenberg’s prose is so vital and so enchanting that you will read this book in the dilated state of a world-traveler, with all of your senses wide open. Her family members are so well-drawn and complex that you’ll close this book certain they exist."

And Wim Wenders calls it

"A captivating tour de force that follows a nomadic family across generations and continents.”

Monologue topics: mail, multilingualism, cultural superiority, Kentucky Fried Chicken, Pizza Hut, Iran, Egypt.

www.otherppl.com

We’re screaming for ice cream because Susan Jane Gilman’s THE ICE CREAM QUEEN OF ORCHARD STREET is finally out today!

The Avid Reader gives it a five-star rating and issues a warning for this book: “you’ll need to have ice cream easily accessible when reading this book; you will crave ice cream.” Check out his full review and see why he thinks this is “a page turner that fascinates and educates.”

litrant
litrant:

My short review of The Phantom of Fifth Avenue: The Mysterious Life and Scandalous Death of Heiress Huguette Clark in this week’s Sacramento News & Review:

Meryl Gordon’s The Phantom of Fifth Avenue: The Mysterious Life and Scandalous Death of Heiress Huguette Clark (Grand Central Publishing, $28) is once again proof that the rich are very different. Huguette Clark, a recluse, was the daughter of a Montana robber baron who loved the spotlight and made boatloads of money. Gordon’s research is impeccable and covers Clark’s privileged upbringing, two decades spent housebound, and her declining years in a private room at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. It’s fascinating and possible proof that money can’t buy everything, but it certainly buys a great deal.

litrant:

My short review of The Phantom of Fifth Avenue: The Mysterious Life and Scandalous Death of Heiress Huguette Clark in this week’s Sacramento News & Review:

Meryl Gordon’s The Phantom of Fifth Avenue: The Mysterious Life and Scandalous Death of Heiress Huguette Clark (Grand Central Publishing, $28) is once again proof that the rich are very different. Huguette Clark, a recluse, was the daughter of a Montana robber baron who loved the spotlight and made boatloads of money. Gordon’s research is impeccable and covers Clark’s privileged upbringing, two decades spent housebound, and her declining years in a private room at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. It’s fascinating and possible proof that money can’t buy everything, but it certainly buys a great deal.

kochology

Koch Family Footage: Bill and David Koch Duke It Out As Tykes

kochology:

Sons of Wichita hit bookstores on Tuesday. The early reviews have been great. Vanity Fair calls Sons of Wichita “never less than engrossing” and “a stylishly written saga.” The American Prospect says “despite Schulman’s often-superb eye for the revealing and/or juicy detail…he never stoops to caricaturing his subjects as the Koch Ness Monsters of popular lore.” Earlier this week, Mother Jones published an excerpt from the book that delved into the long battle between the Koch brothers, which played out in a series of scorched-earth lawsuits that earned untold millions for a small army of lawyers and private eyes. 

As I write in the book, pugilism was a way of life for the Koch family—metaphorically, but also literally. In college, Fred Koch was one of the stars of MIT’s boxing team, which he briefly captained. And he later taught his sons how to fight. During David and Bill Koch’s teenage years, brawls would occasionally erupt between them that were so fierce that Morris, the foreman of the Kochs’ 160-acre property on the outskirts of Wichita, would keep their boxing gloves close at hand to make sure they didn’t seriously injure each other. (At boarding school, Bill joined the boxing squad.)

The clip above, circa the 1940s, shows a more good natured (even endearing) bout between David and Bill as young boys. It was included in a compilation of family footage that was submitted as evidence in the 1991 legal battle over the Koch matriarch’s will.

image

The feud between her sons had devastated Mary Koch. In a last ditch bid to end the legal skirmishes, she included a clause in her will stating that if any of her sons were engaged in litigation against each other at the time of her death, they would be cut out of her estate unless they dropped the lawsuit.

This clause was aimed squarely at Bill and Frederick, who in 1985 had filed suit against their brothers and Koch Industries, claiming they had been misled about the true value of the company when Charles and David bought them out in 1983. Bill and Frederick had no intention of dropping their suit. Following Mary’s December 1990 death they unsuccessfully contested her will, alleging that Charles and Koch family lawyer Bob Howard (whose firm both drafted Mary’s will and represented Charles and David in the 1985 lawsuit brought by their brothers) had unduly influenced her to insert the disinheritance clause. Not long before her death, Mary gave copies of the tape, which she had compiled from old family footage and partially narrated, to her four sons. At trial, it was used to show that she was not of diminished capacity when she decided to revise her will to add the disinheritance clause. 

She hoped it would stop the war. But it only ignited another battle.     

"Suspenseful. Moving. Clever. THE SHADOW YEAR is the perfect book to kick off your summer reading binge."—She Reads”I felt like I was solving a puzzle, getting clues in each and every chapter.”—A Novel Review"The ultimate connection that draws these two characters together, and the final secret revealed, is one I’m still thinking about, days after reading the last page. The Shadow Year will rivet you while you read it and haunt you thereafter.” —Story Matters"This is one of those books that you finish and immediately want to call someone to discuss it. I was so upset that I couldn’t discuss it with anyone. Ahhhhhh……at least I get to write my feelings." —The Readathon

"Suspenseful. Moving. Clever. THE SHADOW YEAR is the perfect book to kick off your summer reading binge."
She Reads

I felt like I was solving a puzzle, getting clues in each and every chapter.”
A Novel Review

"The ultimate connection that draws these two characters together, and the final secret revealed, is one I’m still thinking about, days after reading the last page. The Shadow Year will rivet you while you read it and haunt you thereafter.”
Story Matters

"This is one of those books that you finish and immediately want to call someone to discuss it. I was so upset that I couldn’t discuss it with anyone. Ahhhhhh……at least I get to write my feelings."
The Readathon